Abandoned

Only from above: the best of Google Maps

We get so many submissions of weird and wonderful things our readers have found on Google Maps and Google Earth that we couldn’t possibly post them all. Today however, we are launching a new feature that will bring more of…

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Thursday, 16th June 2011

Ghost Towns of the Palliser Triangle

The Palliser Triangle is the driest part of the Canadian Prairies, constituting southeast Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan. Settled at the turn of the 20th century by farmers and ranchers, dozens of tiny villages sprung up to support them. While modern farming techniques have helped mitigate the hard times, the exodus of people from the Triangle has been steady for the past few decades, leaving numerous ghost towns listing in the wind.

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Tuesday, 14th June 2011

Shipwrecks of Aden

For centuries, the port of [Aden][w] has served as Yemen’s gateway to the the world. Its distinctive double harbour lies in the crater of an extinct volcano. Over the years, a number of wrecked ships have accumulated in Aden’s harbour, many of which are visible in Google Maps imagery.

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Monday, 16th May 2011

25 Years After Chernobyl

Today is the 25 year anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, so we’re taking another look back at the high-resolution imagery of the whole area that Google uploaded for the 20th anniversary of the events of 26 April 1986. In our…

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Tuesday, 26th April 2011

Le Circuit de Reims-Gueux

First used in 1926, le Circuit de Reims-Gueux was a French Formula One and sports car racing circuit built on the public roads between the villages of Gueux and Thillois. The circuit hosted its first French Grand Prix in 1932 and continued to hold the event until 1966. The track closed for good in 1972, but the roads are still in place, and many traces of the old circuit can still be found, including the pit stalls, paddock, and spectator bleachers.

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Thursday, 21st April 2011

Oddities in Washington, DC

Most residents of Washington, DC typically go about their daily lives removed from political machinations. Today we’re going to explore my hometown, but skip the monuments, the museums and the stereotypes to enjoy a more unusual geography. We have Exclaves…

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Monday, 22nd November 2010
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Welcome to Google Sightseeing

Google Sightseeing takes you on a tour of the world as seen from satellite, using the free Google Earth program, or Google Maps in your web browser. Our team of authors present weird and wonderful sights as suggested by readers.

Could you be one of our authors? We're looking for more freelance writers - please get in touch for more information.

Previously on Google Sightseeing

World’s Largest Graffiti? Not even close.

Doing the rounds on the mainstream sites this week has been the story of Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Hamad bin Hamdan…

The Street Art of Newtown, Sydney

Newtown is an inner suburb of Sydney, New South Wales and is one of that city’s major cultural and artistic centres. The suburb is renowned for its graffiti and street art, and since the 1980s all sorts of murals, drawings and paintings, both legal and illegal, have been popping up all over the neighbourhood.

South Sudan

It’s not every day that a new country is created, but that’s what happened on July 9th 2011 when The…

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