Abandoned

Abandoned Stadiums of Europe, South America, and Africa

Every day around the world, millions of people gather in giant stadiums to watch their favourite sporting events and performance acts. But what happens when time inevitably catches up with these facilities? Today we begin our tour of abandoned stadiums from around the world with a look at old arenas in Europe, South America, and Africa.

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Friday, 18th November 2011

Planes on Google Maps, October 2011

One of the most common subjects that readers post through our suggestion form is planes – whether in flight, parked at airports, or in pieces at crash sites. Here is a collection of some of the more interesting finds from…

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Tuesday, 11th October 2011

San Francisco Volcanic Field (Volcano week 6)

There’s a hidden fact about northern Arizona that many non-residents don’t know. The landscape is littered with more than 600 volcanoes, many of which tourists drive right by without a passing glance, as they continue on their way to any…

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Wednesday, 24th August 2011

High Line Park, New York

Recently opened in New York, the High Line is a unique new public park as it isn’t at ground level, but elevated on the former freight railroad spur called the West Side Line. The park covers 2.33 km (1.45 miles)…

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Friday, 19th August 2011

Only from above: the best of Google Maps

We get so many submissions of weird and wonderful things our readers have found on Google Maps and Google Earth that we couldn’t possibly post them all. Today however, we are launching a new feature that will bring more of…

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Thursday, 16th June 2011

Ghost Towns of the Palliser Triangle

The Palliser Triangle is the driest part of the Canadian Prairies, constituting southeast Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan. Settled at the turn of the 20th century by farmers and ranchers, dozens of tiny villages sprung up to support them. While modern farming techniques have helped mitigate the hard times, the exodus of people from the Triangle has been steady for the past few decades, leaving numerous ghost towns listing in the wind.

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Tuesday, 14th June 2011
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Welcome to Google Sightseeing

Google Sightseeing takes you on a tour of the world as seen from satellite, using the free Google Earth program, or Google Maps in your web browser. Our team of authors present weird and wonderful sights as suggested by readers.

Could you be one of our authors? We're looking for more freelance writers - please get in touch for more information.

Previously on Google Sightseeing

On this day: The Golden Gate Bridge Opened

On May 27, 1937, San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge opened, with around 200,000 people walking or roller-skating across on the…

On this day: The Vauxhall Bridge Opened

On May 26, 1906, the new Vauxhall Bridge across the Thames in London opened. This was five years later than…

On this day: The Main Branch of the NY Public Library Opened

On May 23, 1911, the imposing Main Branch of the New York Public Library was opened to the public, with…

Recent Comments

  1. Wayne: I’ve taken one of those half-day tours to Niihau. The helicopter company, owned by the Robinson family,...
  2. Jel: And that’s not to mention the Dutch 11-towns race, when and if it gets cold enough – nigh on 200km....
  3. Andrew Thielmann: Not longest skating anymore: the skating trail on the lake in Invermere (lat/lng:50.493583,...
  4. Allaiyah Weyn: Close to Santa Laura is what looks like a big bloody mess. I wonder what all the red stuff is. The van...
  5. Allaiyah Weyn: I wish I could visit all the ghost towns of the world on Google Earth. Sadly, the van usually passes...

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