Monuments

The Mines of Kimberley

Since 1871, the city of Kimberley in the Northern Cape has been at the centre of the diamond-mining industry in South Africa. The city instantly grew around the burgeoning mines, eventually surrounding many of the giant pits dug into the ground, which have become tourist attractions in their own right.

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Thursday, 28th April 2011

England’s Crop Art and the World’s Largest Jellyfish

In the early Summer of 2009, England’s annual crop art season got underway in spectacular fashion with one of the most impressive creations ever to grace a Barley field – a gargantuan 250m long, 60m wide Jellyfish that appeared one…

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Tuesday, 5th April 2011

The Great Pyramid of Cholula

The Great Pyramid of Cholula in southern Mexico is a little-known archaeological site which may once have been the largest pyramid (by volume) in the world. Also known as Tlachihualtepetl (‘artificial mountain’), the pyramid has a base 450m square –…

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Thursday, 31st March 2011

Yukon Ho! Part 2: The Dempster Highway

We continue our Street View barnstorming tour of Yukon today as we follow the cameras on their 417-mile (671 km) odyssey north along the beautiful, desolate Dempster Highway, built in 1979 to connect the remote Mackenzie Delta to the rest of Canada.

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Tuesday, 1st March 2011

Brasília: a Modernist Masterpiece

The largest city on the planet that wasn’t in existence at the beginning of the 20th century, the city of Brasília was built in 1960 to serve as the new capital of Brazil. One of the greatest civic engineering achievements…

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Wednesday, 9th February 2011

The rise and fall of “B of the Bang”

Back in 2005, when Google Sightseeing was brand new, we were desperate for Google to add aerial images of Manchester and catch a glimpse of the UK’s tallest sculpture, B of the Bang. It’s now six years since the unveiling,…

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Monday, 7th February 2011

Welcome to Google Sightseeing

Google Sightseeing takes you on a tour of the world as seen from satellite, using the free Google Earth program, or Google Maps in your web browser. Our team of authors present weird and wonderful sights as suggested by readers.

Could you be one of our authors? We're looking for more freelance writers - please get in touch for more information.

Previously on Google Sightseeing

The Architecture of Daniel Libeskind

Daniel Libeskind is an American architect known for his bold and unconventional designs for buildings which often significantly (and controversially)…

Trollstigen (Troll’s path)

In a country renowned for its natural beauty, one of the most spectacular landscapes is found along the Trollstigen (Troll’s…

Fill ‘er Up!

In the early days of mass automotive travel, fuel stations often resorted to some wacky gimmicks to differentiate themselves from the pack and lure in customers, such as novelty architecture that made the station building even more of a roadside attraction than the fuel they were selling. Today, many of these wacky 1930s-era stations are icons to thousands of visitors every year.

Recent Comments

  1. Janelle: Hi there, You have done a fantastic job. I will definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends....
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