The Bahamas

Private Paradises: Celebrity-Owned Islands

Who wouldn’t want their own private island to wall themselves off from the rest of the world while enjoying the comforts of wealth and opulence? After all, celebrities do it all the time. Thanks to Google Maps, we can get a glimpse of these water-bound estates and see how the other half live.

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Friday, 3rd June 2011

The World’s Largest Blue Holes

The term “blue hole” is given to sinkholes filled with water where the entrance is below the surface; but they are perhaps more accurately described as “vertical caves”. These caves were formed through normal erosion until the end of the…

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Friday, 15th April 2011

Top 10 Most Expensive Hotel Rooms 2011

With springtime just around the corner (in the Northern hemisphere at least), some readers may be thinking about booking a holiday. You might expect that spending more money on your hotel would guarantee the best stay, but is this true…

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Tuesday, 8th March 2011

Underwater Plane

This is Normans Cay in the Bahamas, and lying submerged just under the surface of the water is a genuine 1980s drug smugglers plane! Here’s a bonus underwater photo of the wreck taken by a guy who snorkled around it.…

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Friday, 18th August 2006

Welcome to Google Sightseeing

Google Sightseeing takes you on a tour of the world as seen from satellite, using the free Google Earth program, or Google Maps in your web browser. Our team of authors present weird and wonderful sights as suggested by readers.

Could you be one of our authors? We're looking for more freelance writers - please get in touch for more information.

Previously on Google Sightseeing

Island Week 6

OK, so we’ve really outdone ourselves this year, but better late than never we always say – this year, November…

Skellig Islands (Island Week 6)

The Skellig Islands are located 13km of Ireland’s south west Kerry coast. In 1996 Skellig Michael was designated as a…

Abandoned Stadiums of Europe, South America, and Africa

Every day around the world, millions of people gather in giant stadiums to watch their favourite sporting events and performance acts. But what happens when time inevitably catches up with these facilities? Today we begin our tour of abandoned stadiums from around the world with a look at old arenas in Europe, South America, and Africa.

Recent Comments

  1. Tammo: Desert week condensed into a single post these days ;) Great stuff though :)
  2. Ian Brown: Sorry, D. King, we get a lot of spam on the site and while most of it gets caught, the occasional one gets...
  3. D. King: What does this have to do with blimp or airship bases?
  4. Tammo: While I’m glad that you mentioned the Rendsburg High Bridge … it DID deprive me of the chance of...
  5. seefit: Thanks for the link to your original post, Ian. Another fine article (as always). :-) It’s nice to know...

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