On this day: Construction Started on Fort Hamilton

On June 11, 1825, the cornerstone was laid for Fort Hamilton in New York City. Although a site of military significance since 1776, the War of 1812 spurred the construction of defensive forts along the coast. Today it is the…

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Wednesday, 11th June 2014

World Cup 2014 Brazil

After much controversy1 around construction delays, worker deaths and civil unrest over the cost of the event and other issues, the 2014 FIFA World Cup will get underway in Brazil on Thursday, with a game between the host nation and…

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Wednesday, 11th June 2014

On this day: The First Boat Race

On June 10, 1829, the first Boat Race took place at Henley-on-Thames, when Cambridge confidently challenged Oxford to a race, only to be soundly beaten.  It took a number of years for the race became a permanent fixture on the…

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Tuesday, 10th June 2014

On this day: Cartier Discovered the St Lawrence

On June 9, 1534, Jacques Cartier became the first European to see the St Lawrence River, where he spent some time exploring before returning to France. Although many people consider this as the start of Canadian history, it is actually…

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Monday, 9th June 2014

On this day: The first train on Chicago’s ‘L’

On June 6, 1892, the first section of Chicago’s iconic ‘L’ (elevated) transit system opened. The Chicago and South Side Rapid Transit Railroad had been constructed along an alley stretching 5.8km (3.6miles) from Van Buren St to 37th St. Thirty…

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Friday, 6th June 2014

Kudzu Infestation in the United States

Introduced to the southeastern United States in the 19th century as an ornamental plant and to help fight against soil erosion, the perennial vine known as kudzu has infested tens of thousands of square kilometres in the US, wiping out forests and native vegetation while covering and engulfing entire buildings.

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Friday, 6th June 2014

Welcome to Google Sightseeing

Google Sightseeing takes you on a tour of the world as seen from satellite, using the free Google Earth program, or Google Maps in your web browser. Our team of authors present weird and wonderful sights as suggested by readers.

Could you be one of our authors? We're looking for more freelance writers - please get in touch for more information.

Previously on Google Sightseeing

The Architecture of Daniel Libeskind

Daniel Libeskind is an American architect known for his bold and unconventional designs for buildings which often significantly (and controversially)…

Trollstigen (Troll’s path)

In a country renowned for its natural beauty, one of the most spectacular landscapes is found along the Trollstigen (Troll’s…

Fill ‘er Up!

In the early days of mass automotive travel, fuel stations often resorted to some wacky gimmicks to differentiate themselves from the pack and lure in customers, such as novelty architecture that made the station building even more of a roadside attraction than the fuel they were selling. Today, many of these wacky 1930s-era stations are icons to thousands of visitors every year.

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